Monday 28th November 2022

Posted in Uncategorized on November 28, 2022 by uppyalf

The Last Resort

Eagles

She came from Providence
One in Rhode Island
Where the old world shadows hang
Heavy in the air
She packed her hopes and dreams
Like a refugee
Just as her father came
Across the sea

She heard about a place
People were smilin’
They spoke about the red man’s way
How they loved the land
And they came from everywhere
To the Great Divide
Seeking a place to stand
Or a place to hide

Down in the crowded bars
Out for a good time
Can’t wait to tell you all
What it’s like up there
They called it paradise
I don’t know why
Somebody laid the mountains low
While the town got high

Then the chilly winds blew down
Across the desert
Through the canyons of the coast
To the Malibu
Where the pretty people play
Hungry for power
To light their neon way
Give them things to do

Some rich men came and raped the land
Nobody caught ’em
Put up a bunch of ugly boxes
And Jesus people bought ’em
They called it paradise
The place to be
They watched the hazy sun
Sinking in the sea

You can leave it all behind and sail to Lahaina
Just like the missionaries did so many years ago
They even brought a neon sign “Jesus is coming”
Brought the white man’s burden down
Brought the white man’s reign

Who will provide the grand design?
What is yours and what is mine?
‘Cause there is no more new frontier
We have got to make it here

We satisfy our endless needs
And justify our bloody deeds
In the name of destiny
And in the name of God

And you can see them there
On Sunday morning
They stand up and sing about
What it’s like up there
They call it paradise
I don’t know why
You call someplace paradise
Kiss it goodbye

Sunday 27th November 2022

Posted in Uncategorized on November 27, 2022 by uppyalf

Saturday 26th November 2022

Posted in Uncategorized on November 26, 2022 by uppyalf

Rio

I’m hearing the light from the window
I’m seeing the sound of the sea
My feet have come loose from their moorings
I’m feeling quite wonderfully free
And I think I will travel to Rio
Using the music for flight
There’s nothing I know of in Rio
But it’s something to do with the night
It’s only a whimsical notion
To fly down to Rio tonight
And I probably won’t fly down to Rio
But then again, I just might
There’s wings to the thought behind fancy
There’s wings to the thought behind play
And dancing to rhythms of laughter
Makes laughter the rhythm of rain
So I think I will travel to Rio
Using the music for flight
There’s nothing I know of in Rio
But it’s something to do with the night
It’s only a whimsical notion
To fly down to Rio tonight
And I probably won’t fly down to Rio
But then again, I just might
I feel such a sense of well-being
The problems have come to be solved
And what I thought was proper for battle
I see now is proper for love
So I think I will travel to Rio
Using the music for flight
There’s nothing I know of in Rio
But it’s something to do with the night
It’s only a whimsical notion
To fly down to Rio tonight
And I probably won’t fly down to Rio
But then again, I just might
I think I will travel to Rio
Using the music for flight
There’s nothing I know of in Rio
But it’s something to do with the night
It’s only a whimsical notion
To fly down to Rio tonight
I probably won’t fly down to Rio
But then again, I just might
Reno? Why Reno?
Not Reno, dummy
Rio

Pigs might fly, or as some would have it ‘pigs may fly’, is an example of an adynaton, that is, a figure of speech that uses inflated comparison to such an extent as to suggest complete impossibility. Other examples are ‘It is easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle…’ and ‘Make a mountain out of a molehill’. The version of the phrase more often used in America is ‘when pigs fly’.

A correspondent recently drew my attention to a book by John Winthrop and wondered if it might be the origin of the expression ‘pigs might fly’. Winthrop was an English Puritan explorer who settled in Massachusetts in 1630 and recounted his story in The History of New England, 1630-1649, which was transcribed from Winthrop’s 17th century notes and published in 1908:

In this year one James Everell, a sober, discreet man, and two others, saw a great light in the night at Muddy River. When it stood still, it flamed up, and was about three yards square; when it ran, it was contracted into the figure of a swine: it ran as swift as an arrow towards Charlton, and so up and down about two or three hours.

Whether Everett and his pals had been at the fermented cranberry juice or whether they were the first to record an attempted alien abduction we don’t know, but we can be sure that their visions weren’t the source of the popular saying.

The original version of the succinct ‘pigs might fly’ was ‘pigs fly with their tails forward’, which is first found in a list of proverbs in the 1616 edition of John Withals’s English-Latin dictionary – A Shorte Dictionarie for Yonge Begynners:

Pigs fly in the ayre with their tayles forward.

This form of the expression was in use for two hundred years as a sarcastic rejoinder to any overly optimistic prediction made by the gullible, much as we now use “…and pigs might fly”.

The phrase ‘Pigs might fly’ – meaning and origin.
The original version of the phrase
‘pigs might fly’ was ‘Pigs in the air
with their tails forward’.
Why pigs? Other creatures were previously cited in similar phrases – ‘snails may fly’, ‘cows might fly’ etc., but it is pigs have stood the test of time as the favoured image of an animal that is particularly unsuited to flight. It is probably the bulkiness of the creatures and their habit of rooting in earth that suggests an intensely ramping nature […and it’s nice to have an opportunity to sneak in the little-used ‘ramping’, which means no more nor less than ‘unable to fly’].

Thomas Fuller, in Gnomologia: A Collection of the Proverbs, Maxims and Adages That Inspired Benjamin Franklin and Poor Richard’s Almanack, 1732, was the first to explicitly single out the pig as a ham-fisted aeronaut:

That is as likely as to see an Hog fly.

The first example that I can find of our currently used ‘pigs may fly/pigs might fly’ form is from The Autobiography of Jack Ketch By Charles Whitehead, 1835:

Yes, pigs may fly, but they’re very unlikely birds.

Having an autobiography that is written by someone else is commonplace in the celebrity-obsessed 21st century, but wasn’t in Ketch’s day. Ketch was the executioner employed by Charles II and his days were lived out in the 17th century, so, unless our eponymous hangman really was a ghost writer, we have to assume the words of an ‘autobiography’ written 150 years after his death were Whitehead’s rather than his.

Flying pigs appeared in print in the UK quite often throughout the rest of the 19th century. The Illustrated Times referred to them in an issue in August 1855:

…pigs might fly. An elephant, too, might dance on the tight-rope,

Pigs may flyLewis Carroll also conjured one up in Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, 1865:

“I’ve a right to think,” said Alice sharply… “Just about as much right,” said the Duchess, “as pigs have to fly.”

Friday 25th November 2022

Posted in Uncategorized on November 25, 2022 by uppyalf

Wednesday 23rd November 2022

Posted in Uncategorized on November 23, 2022 by uppyalf

Tuesday 22nd November 2022

Posted in Uncategorized on November 23, 2022 by uppyalf

Monday21st November 2022

Posted in Uncategorized on November 21, 2022 by uppyalf

Sunday 20th November 2022

Posted in Uncategorized on November 20, 2022 by uppyalf

Saturday 19th November 2022

Posted in Uncategorized on November 19, 2022 by uppyalf

Friday 18th November 2022

Posted in Uncategorized on November 18, 2022 by uppyalf

There is always someone somewhere. My Land My road mine mine mine mine mine. Really it makes me sick to the soul. Walking in the middle of nowhere breathing air my grandfather and father fought for.. Doing no harm just alone with the dog walking. . Up pops a diesel guzzling driver and his tiny friend. My land my road mine mine mine mine. I’m really sick of this country,

I really lost it with this man and woman I have just had enough of being bossed around. I swore a lot I regret that now but it was pure frustration.

Miss Rothschild

Poets are often lost
Lost in thought
Lost in dreams
Lost in the moment
Lost in heartache
But often they are lost
After death
Their books gather dust
Damp and mould
A wife may burn them
A lover may bury them
With his true love
Only to return
To dig them up later
But Miss Rothschild
Her ashes were lost
Famous in her day
For many things
When she passed her ashes
Were lost Misplaced Forgotten
Left unclaimed
At the crematorium
Then in a filing cabinet
All in all for twenty one years
Her childhood home
Is now a vape store
Does this say anything about fame?
Or even fortune
Miss Rothschild
A star was born
But like many poets
Your name will be hidden by smoke
Cloaked in shadows
Lost in the vapour of time

Bish 18th November 2022

Dorothy Parker 1893 –1967

Laid to rest on August 22, 2020