Thursday 11th November 2021

It’s a very sad day. Graeme’s sound and personality is present in everything we did together and thankfully that will live on.
When Graeme told me he was retiring I knew that without him it couldn’t be the Moody Blues anymore. And that’s what happened. It’s true to say that he kept the group together throughout all the years, because he loved it.
In the late 1960’s we became the group that Graeme always wanted it to be, and he was called upon to be a poet as well as a drummer. He delivered that beautifully and brilliantly, while creating an atmosphere and setting that the music would never have achieved without his words. I asked Jeremy Irons to recreate them for our last tours together and it was absolutely magical.
Graeme, and his parents, were very kind to me when I first joined the group, and for the first two years, he and I either lived together, or next door to each other – and despite us having almost nothing in common, we had fun and laughs all the way, as well as making what was probably the best music of our lives.
Graeme was one of the great characters of the music business and there will never be his like again.
My sincerest condolences to his family.

Justin Hayward

Higher And Higher

Blasting, billowing, bursting forth
With the power of ten billion butterfly sneezes
Man with his flaming pyre
Has conquered the wayward breezes
Climbing to tranquility
Far above the cloud
Conceiving the heavens
Clear of misty shroud

Higher and higher
Now we’ve learned to play with fire
Go higher and higher and higher

Vast vision must improve our sight
Perhaps at last we’ll see and end
To our own endless blight
And the beginning of the free
Climb to tranquility
Finding it’s real worth
Conceiving the heavens
Florishing on earth

Higher and higher
Now we’ve learned to play with fire
Go higher and higher and higher

“22,000 Days”

Even tho’ I know it’s only
Me and my dreams
That drive me so let me go please
Let me go onto tomorrow
One day at a time
Now I know the only foe is time

22,000 days, 22,000 days it’s not alot,
It’s all you got 22,000 days
22,000 nights, it’s all you know
So start the show and this time
Feel the flow and get it right

Now the time when I first saw you is over and gone
Then I knew my life with you would go on
Knowing you so much longer
I’ve change in mind change for you
You have changed to mine

22,000 days, 22,000 days it’s not alot,
It’s all you got 22,000 days
22,000 nights, it’s all you know
So start the show and this time
Feel the flow and get it right

Everybody knows, it always shows
Wasting time’s an aggravation
Got no time for confrontation
You want to take a lot
By love by law or stealth
Time’s the only real wealth you have got

Even tho’ I know it’s only me and my dreams
That drive me so let me go please
Let me go onto tomorrow
One day at a time
Now I know the only foe is time

22,000 days, 22,000 days it’s not alot,
It’s all you got 22,000 days
22,000 nights, it’s all you know
So start the show 22,000 days

22,000 days, 22,000 days it’s not a lot,
It’s all you got 22,000 days
22,000 nights, 22,000 nights, it’s all you know
So start the show 22,000 ways

Graeme Edge: Drummer and Founder member of the legendary classic rock band, The Moody Blues.

All the greatest bands have memorable drummers, Charlie Watts, Ringo Starr, John Bonham, Keith Moon. They are the furnace that powers a band’s engine. We have to ad Graeme Edge to that list, as he was that furnace for The Moody Blues.

Graeme was a father, grandfather, husband, musician, songwriter, poet, hellraiser and my ‘tour buddy’ for over 25 years. He was also my dear friend. There will be lots of people writing about Graeme. This is my small contribution.

Whilst this is one of the saddest things I can remember writing in a very long time, Graeme’s life was all about celebration. He ate life, raw. It’s been said, “you can take Graeme out of rock & roll, but you can’t take the rock & roll out of Graeme”. I would walk away from a single conversation with Graeme feeling as though I had been in the presence of Apollo, my oldest brother, a president I wanted to impress, a friend that always got me into trouble, a poet, old father time, someone who once had a martini with the devil and all the best bits of the British Library. Being in conversation with Graeme gave you the feeling that you had been gifted something you were not sure you deserved.

As part of The Moody Blues, he appeared to live the equivalent of 5 stupendous lives to my ordinary 1. He sold out Madison Square Gardens twice in one day, was immortalised on the Simpsons and his drumming and lyrics were recorded onto some 70 million albums. He was awarded 14 platinum and gold discs, presented with an Ivor Novello Award, played every single show with the band for 50 years and in 2018 was inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. He sailed the Atlantic, flew microlights, and was known in the band for crashing more than one car. It didn’t matter if he was eating, drinking, playing the drums, or just living another day – he was fearless.

I’m proud to say we sat next to each other behind two huge drum kits on countless stages around the globe and, played our hearts out on every single Moody Blues world tour for 25 years. It’s rare to have two drummers in a band, but it became second nature to Graeme and me. This was more than a meeting of souls; it was also a dream come true for this younger drummer.

Very early on in my tenure with The Moody Blues, Graeme and I secured the back room of our Prevost tour bus and spent the following decades there, laughing and drinking as we toured America, for what felt like an indefinite period. It was known as the ‘Bad Boys Lounge’. What mostly happened back there were tea and sandwiches (maybe an occasional bottle of wine), with accompanying conversations about family, friends, politics, and life with uncontrollable laughter. Always with uncontrollable laughter.

However, we did indeed have many riotous times together. Even though Graeme was 20 years my senior, I would still often have to leave him in a restaurant or bar after a show, drinking wine, deep in conversation with someone he’d just met, just so I could function the next day. Nevertheless, he was always there next morning, restored to his normal good humour, ready for us to blast another show and leave our souls on the stage. Plus, he loved every minute of it – as did I. As Graeme would have told you, being a musician in a touring rock band is hands down, the best friggin’ job in the world.

Graeme was my inspiration, a force of nature, a humorous, overly generous, and loyal friend. To give you an idea of his philosophy, we were once sitting at the back of the tour bus driving out of Denver, Colorado, buzzing after a show at The Red Rocks Amphitheatre, freshly showered and in our pyjamas, holding two small goldfish bowls containing ice cold delicious white wine, I asked him if he believed in heaven. He tugged on his goatee and wryly said “yes… we’re living there now”.

You will be terribly missed by many Graeme, especially me. Rest in peace my dear friend.

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