Archive for August, 2022

Wednesday 31st August 2022

Posted in Uncategorized on August 31, 2022 by uppyalf

Shape It

I don’t believe in reincarnation
But this boy
This Sir Hector
Made me think on it
He arrived with a tribe
They made a rocket boat
That they rowed through
The seas of space
They cast their sticks with wool
Fishing for intergalactic stars
Ideas spilled from the children
Sea monsters
Lighthouses
Golden paper turned into
Dresses
Cloaks
A throne
Daisy and Fred helped
Clear away the giant
Rolls of cardboard
High fives all the way
Meanwhile Sir Hector and Joseph
Sailed past Mars
Singing songs

Bish 31st August 2022

Tuesday 30th August 2022

Posted in Uncategorized on August 30, 2022 by uppyalf

Monday 9th August 2022

Posted in Uncategorized on August 29, 2022 by uppyalf

The Cake

Life can be like a cake
That you have to eat
You take a piece day after day
Each piece hurts as you live it
Each day the pain can grow worse
Then comes the night
Here the restless soul
Will devour the cake
In handfuls
Every last crumb
They tear apart your thoughts
Throw them in your face
For the next day may just come
Sadness is a cake you have to eat
You take it slice by slice
Each slice hurts as you swallow it
Each time the pain grows worse
And if you decide
You cannot digest it
When you vomit it out
It will hurt even more

Bish 29th August 2022

Sunday 28th August 2022

Posted in Uncategorized on August 28, 2022 by uppyalf

Saturday 27th August 2022

Posted in Uncategorized on August 28, 2022 by uppyalf

Four Crosses – Cannock, Staffordshire

This creepy old building began life as a 17th Century Coaching Inn which has survived a terrifying history
Ghost hunts at The Four Crosses in Cannock are most definitely for those who possess nerves of steel. This creepy old building began life as a 17th Century Coaching Inn which has survived a turbulent and terrifying history. It stands in an area that is infamously known as The Chase, one of the most paranormally active areas of the Country. Some of the more sinister discoveries that have been made here over the years have left owners feeling very anxious, particularly when the ghostly activity they have encountered has been so relentless. The Four Crosses is one of those locations where you dread going into it but feel compelled to do so.
“mysterious happenings”, including “unexplained footsteps, glasses smashing without warning and the reported apparition of a young girl”, according to website Caterer and Hotel Keeper.
Other reported ghostly sightings have included a girl walking through a wall and candlesticks being moved from the fireplace to block toilet doors.
The pub was built in 1636 as a coaching inn from shipping timbers almost 1,000 years old, according to Haunted Rooms, and several secret passages have been discovered within the building during the twentieth century.
It’s reputation for supernatural activity led to it being featured on Yesterday Channel’s Great British Ghosts in 2012 and it remains a regular stopping point for ghost hunts.
Name Origins: Possibly relates to the arms of the Bishop of Lichfield.
History: Well known coaching inn on Watling St. Owned by the Hatherton Family up until the 1950s when it was sold to Bank’s Brewery. Managed by members of the Lovatt Family for around two hundred years until the death of Miss Lovatt, who died in 1940 at the age of 91 and was said to be the country’s oldest licensee at the time. On her death, great-nephew Harry Roland Tomlinson, took over but no longer brewed beer on the premises. Timber framed section built in 1636 – the date is carved into one of the wooden beams on the exterior. Red brick extension dates to around 1700, with further extension at the rear in mid eighteenth century. Currently on the market with an asking price of £400,000 plus VAT.
Features: A verse attributed to Sir Thomas More, which according to old books is supposed to read,’Fleres si scires unum tua tempora mensem, Rides cum non sit forsitan una dies’, is carved on one of the external beams above a ground floor window. However, the first word now reads as ‘N eres’ rather than ‘Fleres’. Perhaps this was a mistake made during restoration work carried out in 1925?
A selection of photographs of past punters and publicans hang on the walls, along with several items of interest including handmade nails that once held together the wooden beams and a page from Lord Hatherton’s account book.
Stories and Legends: Another inscription related story at the Four Crosses is that Jonathan Swift, author of Gulliver’s Travels, stayed here en-route to Ireland and scratched a verse insulting the landlord’s wife into one of the window panes. The exact wording is unknown as the pane of glass is long disappeared. It’s thought to have said something along these lines, “Fool to put up four crosses at your door, Put up your wife, she’s crosser than all four!”. However, some sources suggest that Swift did not clash with the landlady of the Four Crosses in Cannock, but the Four Crosses in Willoughby near Rugby.
During Harry Tomlinson’s time at the inn, an old coachman’s uniform, consisting of a velvet top and a pair of buck skin trousers was discovered. According to local folklore the uniform was found up a chimney, but records held at the County Museum, Shugborough, show the uniform was actually found in a trunk in an attic by Mr Tomlinson’s daughter Mary. The uniform is believed to date from around the late 1820s and a letter held in the museum’s archive suggests that it may have belonged to someone working on the mail coaches in the Birmingham area between about 1815 and 1827.

This is one of the Latin epigrams of the Renaissance scholar and Catholic saint, Sir Thomas More.
In Mortis Diem Omnibus Incertum
Fleres, si scires unum tua tempora mensem;
Rides, cum non sit forsitan una dies.
The vocabulary is keyed to the DCC Latin Vocabulary list. There is only one word in this poem that is not on the DCC list:
incertus -a -um – uncertain, unsure, unreliable
cum: with (prep. + abl.); when, since, although (conjunction + subj.)
diēs diēī m./f.: day
fleo flēre flēvī flētum: weep
forsitan, fortasse: perhaps, perchance
in: in, on (+ abl.); into onto (+ acc)
mēnsis -is m.: month
mors mortis f.: death
nōn: not
omnis -e: all, every, as a whole
rīdeo -ēre rīsī rīsum: laugh, laugh at
scio -īre -īvī/-iī -ītum: know
sī: if
sum, esse, fuī: be, exist
tempus -oris n.: time
tuus -a -um: your
ūnus -a -um: one

On the day
of the dead You would weep, unknown to all, if you knew one month of your times;
You laugh when it is not perhaps one day.

The day of death is unknown to all
You would weep if you knew one of your times a month;
You laugh when it is not perhaps one day.

Friday 26th August 2022

Posted in Uncategorized on August 28, 2022 by uppyalf

Living on a Prayer

Friday night at the bitch and revolver
I feel the loser can’t hurry the fun
With a drink I think maybe
But I sit scared in a way
Not knowing how to behave or what to say
If I had a drink I feel I would lose control
Around the table sit six lost souls
Wishing or wanting or waiting
Bish-Bash-Bosh
And star signs flash in the conversation
Rounds of drinks and food
Big Dave slips out for a cigarette
Memories flood in on Debs
Hanging from a beam
She introduces her past to us
Shares tales of one night stands
And a flexible leg behind her neck
Mel too is open on this subject
Phil looks sad but he says he’s fine
But really I see behind
The free spirit that tries hard
To escape his pain
The dinner lady looks small
Frail and lost to some cause
Checking her sparkling phone
Which brings a soft glow?
To her weary face filled evening
She yawns
Me I sit like Larry the Lamb
“It’s always the quite ones” notes Debs
But is that true?
And I’m really not sure how she knows
Or why she thinks I’m a quite one
Its early days for an analysis
I’ve been a bad boy at times
Is all that I really reveal
I’m a poet
A fireman
And an artist
A very bad mix by anybody
Who knows what’s what
This is a combination that would be
Put on the top of a list of people to avoid
The band sound checks
Then the restless dog
In all of us shows us the way
Familiar music
Hurls from the band
After the wine the girls dance
And dance and dance
More wine
More dance
Hair gets tossed and flicked
If I had joined in with the wine
My hair would still be long
And I too would have shaken it
But mostly we men
Big Dave, Phil, and myself
Watched the girls and felt the music
Debs was hunting around for a splif
The time to leave had arrived
Before we became the taxi
Before we had to mop up the sick on the back seat
I enjoyed the night
It was a lot of fun
But bed calls and the last cup of tea

Bish 30th August 2022

The Dog and Gun Tettenhall

Thursday 25th August 2022

Posted in Uncategorized on August 25, 2022 by uppyalf

Wednesday 24th August 2022

Posted in Uncategorized on August 24, 2022 by uppyalf

Posted in Uncategorized on August 23, 2022 by uppyalf

Chairs

A lady in a park
had chair tattoos
one on each upper arm
The one was an ordinary
Straight back chair
The other was definitely
a plastic garden chair
I walked behind her
For a few steps
Then my curiosity
got the better of me
Politely I enquired
As to the meaning
for her behind the tattoos
She told me that they
Were art related to her work
I understood this
And to feel less uncomfortable
I shared my UppyALf tattoo
And told her that this too
Was a similar reason
Quietly we went back to our days
Just artists in a park

Bish August 23rd 2022

Monday 22nd August 2022

Posted in Uncategorized on August 22, 2022 by uppyalf

Mist coated ice creams Crystal laden coffee Mrs Wallace’s sweets Crinkle crisps Beer Summers that forever rained The reading books For winters stage Popping corks White cliff chalks Running nose that stained his clothes Past an electric fire that cost a packet The meter turned at his music racket To dream while looking Through cracked and broken windows Looking for flying saucers

Go, gentleman, every man unto his charge
Let not our babbling dreams affright our souls:
Conscience is but a word that cowards use,
Devised at first to keep the strong in awe:
Our strong arms be our conscience, swords our law.
March on, join bravely, let us to’t pell-mell
If not to heaven, then hand in hand to hell.

22nd August 1485 Bosworth